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  • 2M2B

    Updated September 6, 2012 12:07 PM
    2M2B is an ethanol-like chemical compound which has recently emerged as a highly potent sedative drug among recreational drug users. The psychoactive effects are described as ethanol-like with a faster onset of action and the absence of a hangover the following day compared with ethanol.
  • 4-amino-3-phenylbutyric acid

    Updated June 19, 2012 5:37 PM
    Phenibut (also known as Phenybut, Fenibut or phenyl-GABA) is a GABA agonist structurally similar to baclofen (Dambrova et al., 2008). It is typically taken orally and appears to produce muscle relaxation, mild euphoria and a sense of well-being. Adverse effects may include dizziness, impaired coordination and loss of consciousness, with some users mentioning rapid development of tolerance. There are also several reports of severe withdrawal symptoms associated with the cessation of prolonged or heavy use of phenibut.
  • 5-IT

    Updated June 6, 2012 3:07 PM
    5-IT is a novel compound with psychostimulant effects similar to those of 5-APB or methiothienylpropamine (MPA). It is desirable as it elicits mild stimulation, increased sense of well-being and Intensification of sensory experience stimulation while having a smoother ‘come-up’ and ‘come-down’ than alpha-methyltryptamine or 5-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran. Untoward health effects have been reported anecdotally, including jaw clenching, increased heart rate and fluctuations in body temperature.
  • AM-2201

    Updated June 19, 2012 11:31 AM
    AM-2201 (also known under the brand name ‘Black Mamba’) is a synthetic cannabinoid agonist structurally similar to JWH-018 (Nakajima et al., 2012). It is typically sold as an herbal mixture intended for smoking and appears to produce euphoria, visual hallucinations and muscle relaxation. Adverse effects may include increased heart rate, impaired coordination, even psychotic episodes. There are also several reports of rapidly developing tolerance associated with prolonged or heavy use of AM-2201.
  • AM-694

    Updated July 6, 2012 11:19 AM
    AM-694 is a potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist typically sold in an herbal or powder form intended for smoking. It appears to produce euphoria, muscle relaxation and urge to talk while adverse effects are reported to include dizziness, visual distortions and even symptoms of paranoia. There are also several reports of rapidly developing tolerance associated with prolonged or heavy use of AM-694.
  • Camfetamine

    Updated August 9, 2012 9:29 PM
    Camfetamine is purported by vendors to be N-methyl-3-phenyl-norbornan-2-amine structurally related to fencamfamine, an anti-fatigue medication (Reynolds, 1982). Fencamfamine is rarely prescribed due to the risk of abuse and dependence. To date, there is limited information about similar risks associated with camfetamine use although anecdotal evidence suggests the development of tolerance with heavy or prolonged use.
  • Desoxypipradol (2-DPMP)

    Updated August 9, 2012 9:28 PM
    Desoxypipradol (2-DPMP) is an analog of pipradol originally developed for treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity deficit (ADHD) but later discontinued in favour of methylphenidate (more commonly known as Ritalin). Since mid-2000s, it has emerged as a drug of abuse and has become known as an active ingredient of legal high product ‘Ivory Wave’. Forum chatter regarding its recreational use seems to have begun in or after March 2007.
  • Dimethocaine (DMC)

    Updated September 20, 2012 5:00 PM
    Dimethocaine, initially used as a local anaesthetic, has recently become known as a cocaine and/or mephedrone replacement among legal high users. According to user reports, the psychoactive effects are mostly cocaine-like and may include euphoria, mild stimulation and increased mental clarity. Adverse effects are not uncommon and may include numbness and soreness of nasal passages (associated with intranasal use) as well as ‘hot flushes’, tremors, rash, nausea and vomiting. Dimethocaine is legal in most EU countries although non-medical use may be prohibited by the European Medicines Agency.
  • Dimethylamylamine (DMAA)

    Updated September 6, 2012 12:06 PM
    DMAA, also known as Pelargonium graveolens or geranium extract, is an unscheduled substance with psychoactive effects likened to ‘classic’ stimulants (for example, cocaine or amphetamines). It is listed as an active ingredient in a number of ‘party pill’ and ‘herbal high’ products, for example Go-E or Pure X-S, which can be readily purchased from 'head shops' or smart shops.
  • Ethylphenidate

    Updated May 23, 2012 2:48 PM
    Ethylphenidate is a novel compound with psychoactive effects similar to those of methylphenidate or methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). It is desirable as it illicits euphoria, mild stimulation and increased sense of well-being while having a smoother ‘come-up’ and ‘come-down’ than methylphenidate. Untoward health effects have been reported anecdotally, including mild anxiety, restlessness and sore nasal passages, with some user reporting cravings and increased need to re-dose.
  • Etizolam

    Updated May 23, 2012 1:56 PM
    Etizolam (also known as Etilaam, Depas, Pasaden) is a depressant drug of the thienodiazepine chemical class of drugs which has recently become increasingly popular as a legal alternative to the benzodiazepine class of drugs. It is typically taken orally in a tablet form with anecdotal user reports citing muscle relaxation, mild euphoria and a sense of well-being. Adverse effects may include dizziness, impaired coordination and sedation, with some users also indicating loss of consciousness and amnesia. Despite this, the drug is supposedly legal in most European countries.
  • MDMAI

    Updated June 8, 2012 10:54 AM
    MDMAI is a novel psychoactive substance which presumably elicits ‘ecstasy’/MDMA-like effects. It belongs to the entactogen class of drugs, however, it is supposedly not as desirable as, for example, 5-IAI, MDAI or MDAT. Its psychoactive effects are thought to include euphoria, a sense of well-being and visual hallucinations. To date, there is a limited amount of information regarding possible harm associated with MDMAI use although user reports suggest a relatively mild side effects profile.
  • Phenazepam

    Updated July 20, 2012 9:31 AM
    Phenazepam (also known as Fenazepam, Phenny or Bonsai) is a depressant drug of the benzodiazepine chemical class of drugs (Zakusov, 1979) which has recently become increasingly popular as a legal alternative to other benzodiazepine drugs (Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, Letter to Baroness Browning, July 20, 2011). It is typically taken orally in a powder form (either in a gelatine capsule or as a blotter) with anecdotal user reports citing muscle relaxation, mild euphoria and a sense of well-being. Adverse effects may include dizziness, impaired coordination and loss of consciousness, with some users also indicating increased need to redose. Despite this, the drug is claimed to be legal in most European countries. [1] [2] [3]

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